What are the good and bad health effects of coffee?

Anonymous asked 3 months ago

What are the good and bad health effects of coffee?

1 Answers

Ramal Lakshan Staff answered 3 months ago

Since coffee contains caffeine, a stimulant, it was wrongfully assumed that coffee increased blood pressure and heart attacks – but it doesn’t. Coffee is a rich source of antioxidants and other bioactive compounds that are healthful.
A thorough meta-analysis published in 2014 analyzed 21 studies which included almost a million people, of which more than 120,000 died over many years. Lifestyle factors were tracked and controlled for, and people that consumed coffee were compared to non-coffee drinkers. Coffee drinkers had a reduction in all-cause mortality, that is coffee drinkers were less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers. Drinking any amount of coffee was associated with a lower death rate, but a maximum reduction in death was noted at 3-4 cups of coffee/day. The reduction in death was 16%.
Coffee consumption is associated with a reduction in coronary heart disease, heart failure and lots of different types of cancer. And we know from basic science studies that coffee reduces insulin resistance. Meta-analyses of multiple studies show a reduction in the development of diabetes. Each cup of coffee consumed daily relates to a reduction in risk of diabetes about 6-7%. (Ask me if you want citations.)
But there are some negative effects. For some individuals, caffeine may contribute to insomnia, anxiety & panic, which may mean coffee is not a healthful choice for those people. Perhaps the most important negative impact of coffee is the risk of osteoporosis. Caffeine causes loss of calcium in the urine. Scientists have been concerned that losing calcium in the urine may impact bone density over time, increasing the risk of weakened bones, known as osteoporosis, and increasing fractures, especially in elderly.
A meta-analysis of 10 studies suggests that coffee increases the risk of fractures. Each cup of coffee consumed daily is associated with an increase in the risk of about 3.5%, so at 4 cups of coffee daily, the long-term risk of fracture will be ~15% higher than non-coffee drinkers. More study is needed in this area, but people at high risk of developing osteoporosis may consider coffee to be an unhealthful choice because of this potentially negative factor.
To the best of our knowledge, decaf coffee has the same benefits as regular coffee, minus the risk of fracture.
Note that the mortality studies I reviewed included people that drink coffee with sugar & cream added, and despite the fact that many people don’t drink their coffee black, there is an overall positive association with coffee consumption. So although it seems logical that adding sugar to your coffee is not a good idea, the best answer we have today is that we cannot say that the combination of coffee plus sugar is not healthful – so if you enjoy your coffee with cream and sugar, continue onward!